Author: Jeff Truan

When to Use Digital Lamination Film for Prints

While there is a multitude of different types of laminating films on the market today, many of them are not yet suited for digital printing. This means that problems can occur during the lamination process, leading to less than stellar results with the finished product. For instance, when you use standard laminating materials on a toner-based digital print, the film won’t properly bond to the toner or paper, leaving it to bubble and peel up easily. As a result, utilizing the proper laminate film for digitally printed product is key. Common offset presses use conventional CMYK ink to print...

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New Streams of Revenue with a Commercial Laminator

You can take your print shop to the next level with the addition of a Commercial Laminator. You will greatly increase the variety of finishes you can offer your customers, and you will help their business grow as they stand above their competition. Cheapest is not always the most efficient way to draw attention to products. Spending a little more than the competition on details like packaging finishing can truly set a product apart. Laminating film comes in a lot more varieties than just gloss or matte. Think canvas, soft touch, textured, leather to name a just few. The...

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Holographic Film – What is it and Where is it Used?

Holographic film is a very thin, flexible plastic film [Polyester (PET), Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) and Nylon (Bonyl)] which has been micro-embossed with patterns or even images. Patterns (such as checker plate or diamonds) or an image (such as a tiger) are created by way of an embossing process which can provide a remarkable 3-D effect and/or spectral (rainbow) coloring. The embossing process is akin to cutting tiny grooves into the films surface at various angles and in different shapes. These micro-embossed grooves cause the “diffraction” of normal white light into stunning spectral color. This phenomenon is not unlike the...

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Troubles With Bubbles? Your Laminate Film May Not be the Culprit

In this article, I would like to address a relatively common issue — called ‘silvering’ — that can occur during the lamination process. Frequently my customers will claim, especially those with older equipment, that they are getting bubbles beneath the surface of their lamination. They might explain that it is all over the surface, or perhaps they’ll describe a particular pattern. Initially, they think it’s a lamination issue; however, more often than not it is a result of what we call silvering. ’Silvering‘:  Caused by a Lack of Heat, Pressure, or Both Silvering is caused by a lack of...

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